7 Years with UNICEF

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A smiling child in Korhogo who is resting, in a car garage.For every child a smile.
A smiling child in Korhogo who is resting, in a car garage.For every child a smile.
Happy child smiling in Gonzagueville, in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.Côte d'Ivoire Minister of Education visiting a preschool made of plastic bricks in Gonzagueville, Côte d’Ivoire with UNICEF Representative Dr. Aboubacar Kampo.This innovative construction technique has several benefits: recycling plastic waste which are polluting the country and in particular cities, engage women through the plastic waste collection and speed up the construction of additional learning space for children at a lower cost.  The first classroom has been built in Gonzagueville, a suburb of Abidjan, in partnership with Conceptos Plasticos, a social business from Columbia, which is now in the process of building a plastic transformation factory in Abidjan. For every child a clean environment.
Happy child smiling in Gonzagueville, in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.Côte d'Ivoire Minister of Education visiting a preschool made of plastic bricks in Gonzagueville, Côte d’Ivoire with UNICEF Representative Dr. Aboubacar Kampo.This innovative construction technique has several benefits: recycling plastic waste which are polluting the country and in particular cities, engage women through the plastic waste collection and speed up the construction of additional learning space for children at a lower cost. The first classroom has been built in Gonzagueville, a suburb of Abidjan, in partnership with Conceptos Plasticos, a social business from Columbia, which is now in the process of building a plastic transformation factory in Abidjan. For every child a clean environment.
A mother applying the Kangaroo method with her babyat the Kangaroo Mother Care Unit at the CHU in Bouaké, a town in central Côte d'Ivoire.Bouaké hospital now has a fully rehabilitated and equipped kangaroo mother care centre, which was built by UNICEF with the support of the French Government. Prematurity is the leading cause of death for newborns in Côte d'Ivoire. The skin-to-skin technique increases the chances of survival for premature babies.For every child, a good start in life.
A mother applying the Kangaroo method with her babyat the Kangaroo Mother Care Unit at the CHU in Bouaké, a town in central Côte d'Ivoire.Bouaké hospital now has a fully rehabilitated and equipped kangaroo mother care centre, which was built by UNICEF with the support of the French Government. Prematurity is the leading cause of death for newborns in Côte d'Ivoire. The skin-to-skin technique increases the chances of survival for premature babies.For every child, a good start in life.
A mother breastfeeding her baby while waiting for him to be weighted and vaccinated in the health center of Gonzagueville, a suburb of Abidjan, in the South of Côte d'Ivoire.Nurses are wearing masks and gloves to protect against the Coronavirus.For every child, health.
A mother breastfeeding her baby while waiting for him to be weighted and vaccinated in the health center of Gonzagueville, a suburb of Abidjan, in the South of Côte d'Ivoire.Nurses are wearing masks and gloves to protect against the Coronavirus.For every child, health.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities.Children received environmental advice, planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly, in the Gonzagueville School, a suburban of Abidjan, the capital Côte d’Ivoire.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child has access to quality education and learns in a healthy environment.
Green school activities in a school in Sakassou, a village of Toumodi, in the center of Côte d’Ivoire.Children received environmental advice. They planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child can learn in a clean and healthy environment.For every child, the right to a clean environment.
Green school activities in a school in Sakassou, a village of Toumodi, in the center of Côte d’Ivoire.Children received environmental advice. They planted and watered trees and seeds, learned how to wash their hands properly.Green schools have been implemented by UNICEF and young champions to ensure that every child can learn in a clean and healthy environment.For every child, the right to a clean environment.
Ouya, 1 years old, is enjoying a photo shoot for World Children's Day in Abidjan, in south of Côte d'Ivoire.
Ouya, 1 years old, is enjoying a photo shoot for World Children's Day in Abidjan, in south of Côte d'Ivoire.
Ouya, 1 years old, is enjoying a photo shoot for World Children's Day in Abidjan, in south of Côte d'Ivoire.
Ouya, 1 years old, is enjoying a photo shoot for World Children's Day in Abidjan, in south of Côte d'Ivoire.
For World Children's day kids took control of Ministries, Media and schools in Côte d'Ivoire. Every 20 November, the world celebrates the anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by celebrating World Children's Day. For the occasion, UNICEF is asking adults and young people around the world to show solidarity with the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children, letting children take over the media, sports, entertainment, business and even governments and flooding the world with blue, wearing blue clothes or accessories at school, on the streets, on social media, in meeting rooms and on sports fields.November 20th is a global day of action for children and children. It aims to raise public awareness and raise funds to help the millions of children who are out of school, deprived of protection and uprooted around the world.  To celebrate this annual event, governments and the stars of entertainment, sports and business will join forces with children to defend their rights. Children, meanwhile, will take the lead in all areas, to focus on issues that matter to them.
For World Children's day kids took control of Ministries, Media and schools in Côte d'Ivoire. Every 20 November, the world celebrates the anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by celebrating World Children's Day. For the occasion, UNICEF is asking adults and young people around the world to show solidarity with the most disadvantaged and vulnerable children, letting children take over the media, sports, entertainment, business and even governments and flooding the world with blue, wearing blue clothes or accessories at school, on the streets, on social media, in meeting rooms and on sports fields.November 20th is a global day of action for children and children. It aims to raise public awareness and raise funds to help the millions of children who are out of school, deprived of protection and uprooted around the world. To celebrate this annual event, governments and the stars of entertainment, sports and business will join forces with children to defend their rights. Children, meanwhile, will take the lead in all areas, to focus on issues that matter to them.
Children attempting lessons at Dar Al Hadith school in Duékoué, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at Dar Al Hadith school in Duékoué, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at the IBN BAZ private college in Duékoué in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at the IBN BAZ private college in Duékoué in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at the IBN BAZ private college in Duékoué in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at the IBN BAZ private college in Duékoué in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at the Daroul Coran Walhadiss school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at the Daroul Coran Walhadiss school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
A boy playing outside, in Djongokaha, a village of Ferkessédougou, in the North of Côte d’Ivoire. For every child, a smile.
A boy playing outside, in Djongokaha, a village of Ferkessédougou, in the North of Côte d’Ivoire. For every child, a smile.
Yacouba and his niece Leslie, listening to the radio together, in Djongokaha, village of Ferkessédougou, north of Côte d'Ivoire.
Yacouba and his niece Leslie, listening to the radio together, in Djongokaha, village of Ferkessédougou, north of Côte d'Ivoire.
A baby being weighed at a health center in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, health.
A baby being weighed at a health center in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, health.
A girl attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A girl attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A girl attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A girl attempting lessons at an Islamic school in Man in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children at the playground of their school, made out of recycled plastic bricks, in Donniedougou, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire. UNICEF Côte d’Ivoire has partnered with Columbian social business Conceptos Plasticos to turn plastic waste into construction materials for new schools.Research suggests that over the next 30 years, the world may produce four times more plastic than we ever have before. Finding innovative uses for plastic will become imperative to public health. Without plastic waste management, groundwater pollution may leave many communities without access to clean water. Plastic-clogged drains could continue to cause flooding and damage infrastructure. And air pollution from burning trash will pose major environmental and health risks.Because of their cost-effectiveness, durability, and ease-of-assembly, bricks made from 100% plastic waste have the potential to disrupt the conventional construction model and catalyze a market for recycled plastic worldwide. Millions of waste pickers working informally in landfills and on city streets around the world could become key waste management partners – elevated out of poverty as they help clean our planet, and provide building blocks for the futures of our children.To read more about his project : https://www.unicef.org/stories/turning-trash-building-blocks-childrens-futures
Children at the playground of their school, made out of recycled plastic bricks, in Donniedougou, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire. UNICEF Côte d’Ivoire has partnered with Columbian social business Conceptos Plasticos to turn plastic waste into construction materials for new schools.Research suggests that over the next 30 years, the world may produce four times more plastic than we ever have before. Finding innovative uses for plastic will become imperative to public health. Without plastic waste management, groundwater pollution may leave many communities without access to clean water. Plastic-clogged drains could continue to cause flooding and damage infrastructure. And air pollution from burning trash will pose major environmental and health risks.Because of their cost-effectiveness, durability, and ease-of-assembly, bricks made from 100% plastic waste have the potential to disrupt the conventional construction model and catalyze a market for recycled plastic worldwide. Millions of waste pickers working informally in landfills and on city streets around the world could become key waste management partners – elevated out of poverty as they help clean our planet, and provide building blocks for the futures of our children.To read more about his project : https://www.unicef.org/stories/turning-trash-building-blocks-childrens-futures
Aicha 12, Rokia, 8, Mariam, 13, attending class in an Islamic school in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Aicha 12, Rokia, 8, Mariam, 13, attending class in an Islamic school in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Aka, 34, is a teacher in Sangouiné, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.The woman said: "I had to teach in traditional brick buildings and today I teach in a class made from recycled plastic bricks. In terms of comparison, the plastic brick classes are more. spacious and more airy. It is a pleasure to teach in these rooms. It is a new way of building and that impresses us.More and more the results of children are much better. The children are now happy to come to school they feel privileged. "
Aka, 34, is a teacher in Sangouiné, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.The woman said: "I had to teach in traditional brick buildings and today I teach in a class made from recycled plastic bricks. In terms of comparison, the plastic brick classes are more. spacious and more airy. It is a pleasure to teach in these rooms. It is a new way of building and that impresses us.More and more the results of children are much better. The children are now happy to come to school they feel privileged. "
A child playing outside in Sangouiné, western Ivory Coast.For each child the smile.
A child playing outside in Sangouiné, western Ivory Coast.For each child the smile.
Smiling children playing outside in Sangouiné, western Ivory Coast.For every child the smile.
Smiling children playing outside in Sangouiné, western Ivory Coast.For every child the smile.
Smiling children playing outside in Sangouiné, western Ivory Coast.For every child the smile.
Smiling children playing outside in Sangouiné, western Ivory Coast.For every child the smile.
Carmelle, born 1 week ago, is waiting with her aunt Zran Félicité, 22, at the regional hospital in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Carmelle, born 1 week ago, is waiting with her aunt Zran Félicité, 22, at the regional hospital in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Chris Kyllian, 2 months old, is measured and weighed at the regional hospital in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Chris Kyllian, 2 months old, is measured and weighed at the regional hospital in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Samuel, 9 months old, is measured and weighed at the regional hospital in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Samuel, 9 months old, is measured and weighed at the regional hospital in Man, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Lydie, 36, is doing the Kangaroo Care technique with Ephraim, her baby born a week ago.The woman says, "Around the 8th month of my pregnancy, I got sick and it triggered the delivery. My baby was born premature.This is my first child, and I must admit that I was very scared.Immediately after his birth he was placed in an incubator and when he was released, the midwife advised us on the Kangaroo care method.As soon as I got home I applied the method and immediately observed satisfactory results. I also manage to move with him. We have several breaks during the day and we sometimes come here to the hospital to check if everything is going well.Today I am serene because the results are very encouraging.In addition to that it brings us closer I give it warmth.I really think this method is an advantage and would recommend it to any mom whose baby is born prematurely. "
Lydie, 36, is doing the Kangaroo Care technique with Ephraim, her baby born a week ago.The woman says, "Around the 8th month of my pregnancy, I got sick and it triggered the delivery. My baby was born premature.This is my first child, and I must admit that I was very scared.Immediately after his birth he was placed in an incubator and when he was released, the midwife advised us on the Kangaroo care method.As soon as I got home I applied the method and immediately observed satisfactory results. I also manage to move with him. We have several breaks during the day and we sometimes come here to the hospital to check if everything is going well.Today I am serene because the results are very encouraging.In addition to that it brings us closer I give it warmth.I really think this method is an advantage and would recommend it to any mom whose baby is born prematurely. "
A smiling child in Drongouiné, western Côte d'Ivoire
A smiling child in Drongouiné, western Côte d'Ivoire
A smiling child in Dontro, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A smiling child in Dontro, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A baby is weighed and measured at the Gonzagueville Health Center in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A baby is weighed and measured at the Gonzagueville Health Center in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A child, happy about the start of the school year, in Yopougon, a suburban of abidjan, in the south of Côte d'Ivoire.
A child, happy about the start of the school year, in Yopougon, a suburban of abidjan, in the south of Côte d'Ivoire.
Happy children playing in the schoolyard in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Happy children playing in the schoolyard in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Sprinter Murielle Ahouré, UNICEF National Ambassador in Côte d'Ivoire, committed to girls' education, visited schools in Man, western Côte d'Ivoire.She talked to the girls about the problems they face, inspired them to be champions, and distributed school kits and sanitary towels.For each child, a champion.
Two girls in the playground, in an Islamic school in Korhogo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Two girls in the playground, in an Islamic school in Korhogo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children attending class at an Islamic school in Wolo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children attending class at an Islamic school in Wolo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Solo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Solo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Solo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Solo, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Children playing outside in Wolo in the north of Côte d'Ivoire.
Children playing outside in Wolo in the north of Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Boundiali, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Boundiali, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Training of teachers in Islamic schools, on the issue of children's rights and, in Kolia, in the north of Côte d'Ivoire.
Training of teachers in Islamic schools, on the issue of children's rights and, in Kolia, in the north of Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class at an Islamic school in Ferkessedougou, northern Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
A child attending class in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attending class in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attending class in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attending class in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A smiling child playing outside in Soubré, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A smiling child playing outside in Soubré, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A smiling child, playing outside in Parc Sou, west of Côte d'Ivoire.
A smiling child, playing outside in Parc Sou, west of Côte d'Ivoire.
A cHild, happy with his new classroom made out of plastic bricks in Nafabougou, in the North west of Côte d'Ivoire.UNICEF Côte d'Ivoire has partnered with Columbian social business Conceptos Plasticos to turn plastic waste into construction materials for new schools.Research suggests that over the next 30 years, the world may produce four times more plastic than we ever have before. Finding innovative uses for plastic will become imperative to public health. Without plastic waste management, groundwater pollution may leave many communities without access to clean water. Plastic-clogged drains could continue to cause flooding and damage infrastructure. And air pollution from burning trash will pose major environmental and health risks.Because of their cost-effectiveness, durability, and ease-of-assembly, bricks made from 100% plastic waste have the potential to disrupt the conventional construction model and catalyze a market for recycled plastic worldwide. Millions of waste pickers working informally in landfills and on city streets around the world could become key waste management partners - elevated out of poverty as they help clean our planet, and provide building blocks for the futures of our children.To read more about his project: https://www.unicef.org/stories/turning-trash-building-blocks-childrens-futures
A cHild, happy with his new classroom made out of plastic bricks in Nafabougou, in the North west of Côte d'Ivoire.UNICEF Côte d'Ivoire has partnered with Columbian social business Conceptos Plasticos to turn plastic waste into construction materials for new schools.Research suggests that over the next 30 years, the world may produce four times more plastic than we ever have before. Finding innovative uses for plastic will become imperative to public health. Without plastic waste management, groundwater pollution may leave many communities without access to clean water. Plastic-clogged drains could continue to cause flooding and damage infrastructure. And air pollution from burning trash will pose major environmental and health risks.Because of their cost-effectiveness, durability, and ease-of-assembly, bricks made from 100% plastic waste have the potential to disrupt the conventional construction model and catalyze a market for recycled plastic worldwide. Millions of waste pickers working informally in landfills and on city streets around the world could become key waste management partners - elevated out of poverty as they help clean our planet, and provide building blocks for the futures of our children.To read more about his project: https://www.unicef.org/stories/turning-trash-building-blocks-childrens-futures
A child smiles and plays in the courtyard of the EPP Gendarmerie school in Abobo, a suburban area of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A child smiles and plays in the courtyard of the EPP Gendarmerie school in Abobo, a suburban area of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.
Zakpa née N'Takpé is a teacher at EPP Gendarmerie, in Abobo, a suburban of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.
Zakpa née N'Takpé is a teacher at EPP Gendarmerie, in Abobo, a suburban of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attending classes at the EPP Gendarmerie school in Abobo, a suburban area of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attending classes at the EPP Gendarmerie school in Abobo, a suburban area of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.
Barakissa, 6 years old, is attending classes in Touba, in the northwest of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Barakissa, 6 years old, is attending classes in Touba, in the northwest of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, education.
Happy smiling child in Abidjan, southern Côte d’Ivoire.For every child a smile.
Happy smiling child in Abidjan, southern Côte d’Ivoire.For every child a smile.
Soulé Nadia, 21, is learning to read and write, as well as baking, at the women's training and education institution in Adjamé, a neighborhood of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.The Institutions of Training and Education of Women (IFEF), is a center where people wishing to learn a trade or receive training can go to learn several disciplines.  These include sewing, baking, embroidery, literacy, and family life education modules as well as civic and moral education.For every child a second chance.
Soulé Nadia, 21, is learning to read and write, as well as baking, at the women's training and education institution in Adjamé, a neighborhood of Abidjan in southern Côte d'Ivoire.The Institutions of Training and Education of Women (IFEF), is a center where people wishing to learn a trade or receive training can go to learn several disciplines. These include sewing, baking, embroidery, literacy, and family life education modules as well as civic and moral education.For every child a second chance.
Koffi Amandine Huguette, 38 years old, is learning pastry making at the institution of training and female education in Adjamé, a district of Abidjan, in the south of Côte d'Ivoire.The woman says, "I have been enrolled here since September 2021.Before coming here, I was a security guard. It was very difficult because there was no time off. You had to work 7 days a week. That's what pushed me to quit that job. What pushed me to enroll in the institution of training and female education of Adjamé, is that I would like one day to have my own pastry shop, it is a field that I love. I think that working for oneself is a noble goal. Yesterday I had a job and today I'm paying to learn pastry. It's not easy because I have a lot of responsibilities, like taking care of my son who is in his last year of high school, but I'm more than motivated because I'm sure I could settle down when I leave here. The quality of education is very good. I would like to be able to buy more equipment to excel quickly and be able to practice when I am at home. Finances are my first challenge. In addition to baking, I would love to do embroidery.I would like to encourage young girls to join the institute. Eventually they could take care of themselves and their families."The Institutions of Training and Education of Women (IFEF), is a center where people wishing to learn a trade or receive training can go to learn several disciplines.  These include sewing, baking, embroidery, literacy, and family life education modules as well as civic and moral education.For every child a second chance.
Koffi Amandine Huguette, 38 years old, is learning pastry making at the institution of training and female education in Adjamé, a district of Abidjan, in the south of Côte d'Ivoire.The woman says, "I have been enrolled here since September 2021.Before coming here, I was a security guard. It was very difficult because there was no time off. You had to work 7 days a week. That's what pushed me to quit that job. What pushed me to enroll in the institution of training and female education of Adjamé, is that I would like one day to have my own pastry shop, it is a field that I love. I think that working for oneself is a noble goal. Yesterday I had a job and today I'm paying to learn pastry. It's not easy because I have a lot of responsibilities, like taking care of my son who is in his last year of high school, but I'm more than motivated because I'm sure I could settle down when I leave here. The quality of education is very good. I would like to be able to buy more equipment to excel quickly and be able to practice when I am at home. Finances are my first challenge. In addition to baking, I would love to do embroidery.I would like to encourage young girls to join the institute. Eventually they could take care of themselves and their families."The Institutions of Training and Education of Women (IFEF), is a center where people wishing to learn a trade or receive training can go to learn several disciplines. These include sewing, baking, embroidery, literacy, and family life education modules as well as civic and moral education.For every child a second chance.
Mother and baby use a handwashing station set up by UNICEF at a health center in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
Mother and baby use a handwashing station set up by UNICEF at a health center in Abidjan, southern Côte d'Ivoire.
The UNICEF Champion, the famous animator Jean Michel Onnin is on a field mission in the North of Côte d'Ivoire.During his visit, he participated in an inter-community dialogue between the youth and adolescents of the villages of Kafolo and Tchambétolo on peace and social cohesion.He visited a UNICEF-supported center in Guingreni as part of the Girl Power project. This center provides civic and vocational training to vulnerable and out-of-school adolescent girls, in order to offer them opportunities for professional integration. He visited the center to see demonstrations of the U-Test kit, which allows people to do their own HIV test in complete confidentiality, and the UBT uterine kit, a device that saves the lives of mothers by reducing hemorrhaging after childbirth.He also met with the U-Report community in Korhogo.For every child, a champion.
The UNICEF Champion, the famous animator Jean Michel Onnin is on a field mission in the North of Côte d'Ivoire.During his visit, he participated in an inter-community dialogue between the youth and adolescents of the villages of Kafolo and Tchambétolo on peace and social cohesion.He visited a UNICEF-supported center in Guingreni as part of the Girl Power project. This center provides civic and vocational training to vulnerable and out-of-school adolescent girls, in order to offer them opportunities for professional integration. He visited the center to see demonstrations of the U-Test kit, which allows people to do their own HIV test in complete confidentiality, and the UBT uterine kit, a device that saves the lives of mothers by reducing hemorrhaging after childbirth.He also met with the U-Report community in Korhogo.For every child, a champion.
Krou Rachelle, 32, a preschool teacher, is the nursery supervisor at a UNICEF-supported center in Guingreni, northern Côte d'Ivoire, as part of the Girl Power project.She looks after the babies while their mothers, trainees, attend classes.The woman says, "Here at the crèche we have 15 babies ranging from less than 1, to 4 years old.Here we treat all the children the same, we feed them the same.Their daily activities are mainly eating, sleeping, and playing.We are aware of our role in this center. We teach the children to be able to detach themselves from their mothers for the time they need to attend the training.  We also prepare the babies to be able to detach themselves when their moms go out to do internships, which will be a help to these young moms who are taking a second chance in life.We also teach them the basics and how to socialize with others.I am a mother of two girls, and I am passionate about this profession. It is God who guided me towards this path. Children teach us about life, and you must live it to understand it. I always say to myself that everything happens from 0 to 6 years old and therefore I must be up to the task and supervise them with quality. When you give them love, they give it back to you.I would like my classroom to be more beautiful for the children, with more games.In the future I would like to open a day care center, a nursery, a school for children.I wish all these young trainees’ success. I wish that they can realize their dreams."The center provides civic and vocational training to vulnerable and out-of-school adolescent girls, offering them opportunities for professional integration.For every child, a second chance in life.
Krou Rachelle, 32, a preschool teacher, is the nursery supervisor at a UNICEF-supported center in Guingreni, northern Côte d'Ivoire, as part of the Girl Power project.She looks after the babies while their mothers, trainees, attend classes.The woman says, "Here at the crèche we have 15 babies ranging from less than 1, to 4 years old.Here we treat all the children the same, we feed them the same.Their daily activities are mainly eating, sleeping, and playing.We are aware of our role in this center. We teach the children to be able to detach themselves from their mothers for the time they need to attend the training. We also prepare the babies to be able to detach themselves when their moms go out to do internships, which will be a help to these young moms who are taking a second chance in life.We also teach them the basics and how to socialize with others.I am a mother of two girls, and I am passionate about this profession. It is God who guided me towards this path. Children teach us about life, and you must live it to understand it. I always say to myself that everything happens from 0 to 6 years old and therefore I must be up to the task and supervise them with quality. When you give them love, they give it back to you.I would like my classroom to be more beautiful for the children, with more games.In the future I would like to open a day care center, a nursery, a school for children.I wish all these young trainees’ success. I wish that they can realize their dreams."The center provides civic and vocational training to vulnerable and out-of-school adolescent girls, offering them opportunities for professional integration.For every child, a second chance in life.
Awa, 20, kisses her baby Aminata, 8 months old, in Guingreni in northern Côte d'Ivoire.
Awa, 20, kisses her baby Aminata, 8 months old, in Guingreni in northern Côte d'Ivoire.
Koné Awa, 20, is an intern at a UNICEF-supported center in Guingreni, northern Côte d'Ivoire, as part of the Girl Power project.The girl says: "Before arriving here, I was trading with my mother. One day the police asked us not to sell any more on the space on which we were. I found myself without any activity.My parents are divorced, and I stopped school in CE1 class. I was taken in by my grandmother and I went to Koranic school.When I was 15, my Koranic school principal, who was 38, made advances to me. I was forced to marry him as his second. He demanded that I be circumcised before the wedding and unfortunately that is what was done. He also demanded that I quit Koranic school.He forced me to sleep with him, even when I was sick. He was punishing me because I usually didn't want to do it.I got pregnant with twins in my first pregnancy. I had a miscarriage at 7 months.When I had my second pregnancy from him, he refused to take care of me, saying it was my problem and he had no money. One day I was so hungry that I searched in his wallet to take 1000F. Finally, this money allowed me to flee from his home to go back to my mother. He said he didn't want to see me again. After negotiation with my father, I returned to his home. He beat me unconscious with an axe. After I gave birth, he divorced me saying that I disgusted him.Today I met someone else with whom I had a baby who is 8 months old.I found out about this center through a friend. She was the one who encouraged me to sign up. At the beginning, it was not easy, especially the civic training with the military.I was also scared because I had a child and I thought it would get in the way of my training.But I was reassured and today I am very grateful to the supervisor of the crèche who takes care of my baby while I go to school quietly. The fact that there was a crèche gave me a new chance and relieved me.At first, I was sad about my experience. Thanks to the support of the social worker and the intervention of the legal clinic, I managed to open up. I also met wonderful friends with whom I form a family. I am very grateful to be here.Here during these 3 months, I learned to read and write, to socialize, discipline and many other things that will serve me in life.Today I am more confident, and I feel that there has been a great evolution in my life and I am proud.I want to become a professional cook, a chef."The center provides civic and professional training to vulnerable and out-of-school adolescent girls, thus offering them opportunities for professional integration.For every child, a second chance in life.
Koné Awa, 20, is an intern at a UNICEF-supported center in Guingreni, northern Côte d'Ivoire, as part of the Girl Power project.The girl says: "Before arriving here, I was trading with my mother. One day the police asked us not to sell any more on the space on which we were. I found myself without any activity.My parents are divorced, and I stopped school in CE1 class. I was taken in by my grandmother and I went to Koranic school.When I was 15, my Koranic school principal, who was 38, made advances to me. I was forced to marry him as his second. He demanded that I be circumcised before the wedding and unfortunately that is what was done. He also demanded that I quit Koranic school.He forced me to sleep with him, even when I was sick. He was punishing me because I usually didn't want to do it.I got pregnant with twins in my first pregnancy. I had a miscarriage at 7 months.When I had my second pregnancy from him, he refused to take care of me, saying it was my problem and he had no money. One day I was so hungry that I searched in his wallet to take 1000F. Finally, this money allowed me to flee from his home to go back to my mother. He said he didn't want to see me again. After negotiation with my father, I returned to his home. He beat me unconscious with an axe. After I gave birth, he divorced me saying that I disgusted him.Today I met someone else with whom I had a baby who is 8 months old.I found out about this center through a friend. She was the one who encouraged me to sign up. At the beginning, it was not easy, especially the civic training with the military.I was also scared because I had a child and I thought it would get in the way of my training.But I was reassured and today I am very grateful to the supervisor of the crèche who takes care of my baby while I go to school quietly. The fact that there was a crèche gave me a new chance and relieved me.At first, I was sad about my experience. Thanks to the support of the social worker and the intervention of the legal clinic, I managed to open up. I also met wonderful friends with whom I form a family. I am very grateful to be here.Here during these 3 months, I learned to read and write, to socialize, discipline and many other things that will serve me in life.Today I am more confident, and I feel that there has been a great evolution in my life and I am proud.I want to become a professional cook, a chef."The center provides civic and professional training to vulnerable and out-of-school adolescent girls, thus offering them opportunities for professional integration.For every child, a second chance in life.
Germaine, 38, embraces her 7-month-old son Ibrahim in Fangbokaha, northern Côte d'Ivoire.
Germaine, 38, embraces her 7-month-old son Ibrahim in Fangbokaha, northern Côte d'Ivoire.
Amira, 8, attends classes in Sangouiné, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education
Amira, 8, attends classes in Sangouiné, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education
Marie Paule, 9 and Marie Divine 9, attend classes in Sangouiné, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education
Marie Paule, 9 and Marie Divine 9, attend classes in Sangouiné, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education
Grace,22, is learning to read and write at the Soubré Women's Training Institute in western Côte d'Ivoire.UNICEF Sweden field visit to women's training institutes in Soubré, and Ouragahio, in western Côte d'Ivoire.During the visit, they interacted with trainees and teachers to learn about the realities and challenges and to ensure that every girl has access to quality training.For every child a champion.(Release Obtained)
Grace,22, is learning to read and write at the Soubré Women's Training Institute in western Côte d'Ivoire.UNICEF Sweden field visit to women's training institutes in Soubré, and Ouragahio, in western Côte d'Ivoire.During the visit, they interacted with trainees and teachers to learn about the realities and challenges and to ensure that every girl has access to quality training.For every child a champion.(Release Obtained)
Benedicte, 16, learns pastry at the women's training institute in Soubré, western Côte d'Ivoire.UNICEF Sweden field visit to women's training institutes in Soubré, and Ouragahio, in western Côte d'Ivoire.During the visit, they interacted with trainees and teachers to learn about the realities and challenges and to ensure that every girl has access to quality training.For every child a champion.(Release Obtained)
Benedicte, 16, learns pastry at the women's training institute in Soubré, western Côte d'Ivoire.UNICEF Sweden field visit to women's training institutes in Soubré, and Ouragahio, in western Côte d'Ivoire.During the visit, they interacted with trainees and teachers to learn about the realities and challenges and to ensure that every girl has access to quality training.For every child a champion.(Release Obtained)
Deborah, 24, is learning pastry at the Ouragahio Women's Training Institute in western Côte d'Ivoire.The girl says: « I quit school when I was in fifth grade, when I had just passed my college entrance exam. The reason was that there was no one available to walk me to school every day. So my father asked me to stop going to school. I was very sad about this and cried for about 2 weeks. After that, I had to get over it. When I left school, I dreamed of becoming a judge to work for more justice in society.Being disabled, I always take the good side of life, which makes my daily life less difficult. In society I am very appreciated for my sympathy and my intelligence and nobody has ever made fun of me or insulted me. I love to sing and I regularly participate in my church choir.For me it is a chance to be in this training institute. I am learning pastry, which I have always loved. When I finish my training, I would like to have my own pastry store and make cakes for weddings and other events.I would like to speak to young people with disabilities like myself and tell them to never give up hope. With their ideas, they can develop great things and make their mark. » UNICEF Sweden field visit to women's training institutes in Soubré, and Ouragahio, in western Côte d'Ivoire.During the visit, they interacted with trainees and teachers to learn about the realities and challenges and to ensure that every girl has access to quality training.For every child a champion.(Release Obtained)
Deborah, 24, is learning pastry at the Ouragahio Women's Training Institute in western Côte d'Ivoire.The girl says: « I quit school when I was in fifth grade, when I had just passed my college entrance exam. The reason was that there was no one available to walk me to school every day. So my father asked me to stop going to school. I was very sad about this and cried for about 2 weeks. After that, I had to get over it. When I left school, I dreamed of becoming a judge to work for more justice in society.Being disabled, I always take the good side of life, which makes my daily life less difficult. In society I am very appreciated for my sympathy and my intelligence and nobody has ever made fun of me or insulted me. I love to sing and I regularly participate in my church choir.For me it is a chance to be in this training institute. I am learning pastry, which I have always loved. When I finish my training, I would like to have my own pastry store and make cakes for weddings and other events.I would like to speak to young people with disabilities like myself and tell them to never give up hope. With their ideas, they can develop great things and make their mark. » UNICEF Sweden field visit to women's training institutes in Soubré, and Ouragahio, in western Côte d'Ivoire.During the visit, they interacted with trainees and teachers to learn about the realities and challenges and to ensure that every girl has access to quality training.For every child a champion.(Release Obtained)
Siaba Yvan, a child with a disability, is integrated into the primary school in Guégoin, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
Siaba Yvan, a child with a disability, is integrated into the primary school in Guégoin, in the west of Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attends class in Guégouin in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends class in Guégouin in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends class in Guégouin in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends class in Guégouin in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Akissi 10 attends class in Bafindala, western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Akissi 10 attends class in Bafindala, western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Traoré Massé is a pupil from a bridging class at Bafingdala school in western Côte d'Ivoire.The bridging classes offer out-of-school children a second chance to enter or re-enter the formal school system.For every child, education.
Traoré Massé is a pupil from a bridging class at Bafingdala school in western Côte d'Ivoire.The bridging classes offer out-of-school children a second chance to enter or re-enter the formal school system.For every child, education.
Traoré Massé is a pupil from a bridging class at Bafingdala school in western Côte d'Ivoire.The bridging classes offer out-of-school children a second chance to enter or re-enter the formal school system.For every child, education.
Traoré Massé is a pupil from a bridging class at Bafingdala school in western Côte d'Ivoire.The bridging classes offer out-of-school children a second chance to enter or re-enter the formal school system.For every child, education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Touba in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Children attend classes in Odiénné in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Children attend classes in Odiénné in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Odiénné in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Odiénné in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
Jaures, 7, attends class in Odiénné, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Jaures, 7, attends class in Odiénné, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Twins Jaures and Emmanuel, both 7, attend class in Odiénné, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Twins Jaures and Emmanuel, both 7, attend class in Odiénné, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A child attends classes in Odiénné in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A child attends classes in Odiénné in western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child education.
A woman washes her child's hand after using a latrine built in Kpohoh, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A woman washes her child's hand after using a latrine built in Kpohoh, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A child washes his hands after using a latrine in Kpoho, western Côte d'Ivoire.
A child washes his hands after using a latrine in Kpoho, western Côte d'Ivoire.
Boris, 4, uses the toilet and washes his hands in Klapleu, western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, access to quality water.
Boris, 4, uses the toilet and washes his hands in Klapleu, western Côte d'Ivoire.For every child, access to quality water.

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